Skip to main content

Cardiff Open Air Theatre Festival (Preview)

It's that time of year again....Cardiff's Open Air Theatre Festival! 



Now granted the last week's weather hasn't been exactly summery here (it is Wales after all) but never fear because once again the audience will be completly undercover. So now that you've cheered Wales on in the Euros out in the open (ouch, sorry about that sporting folks, or indeed rejoice! if you're English) it's time instead to take in some theatre in the air.

First up is Sondheim's dark musical fairytale Into the Woods playing from 23 June – 2 July. Directed by Richard Tunley with Musical Direction by Rob Thorne Jnr. audiences are transported to an alternative take on classic fairytales with Sondheim's classic and beautiful score. 

Following the musical...you must...Listen very carefully for I shall say this only once. Excuse the bad joke, it is of course 'Allo 'Allo  from 7 July – 16 July the Café René will welcome summertime audiences to the little French rural town of Nouvion. For those unfamilar with the classic sitcom Owner René Artois risks more than his life on a daily basis during wartime German occupation as he attempts to satisfy the demands of the German Army, the French Resistance, his wife and both his waitresses! And this being an outrageous farce of a comedy things rarely go to plan. The team that brought you last year’s hilarious staging of Blackadder, lead by director Simon H West turn their hand to a new but equally popular comedy this year. 

As many will know, this year has been a year of celebration for Shakespeare fans, with the 400th Anniversary meaning the Bard in all forms has been celebrated. What better way then to continue the celebrations than with his most famous love story Romeo and Juliet  from 21 July – 30 July. Directed by Jack Paterson and Mark Modzelewski, this modern take on fair Verona brings to life through movement, song and story Shakespeare’s classic tale of “star-cross’d lovers. 
 
For younger audiences this year  Disney’s Peter Pan flies into the festival from 23-30 July. performed by AndGo Theatre and choreographed and directed by Emma Jayne Parker. Based on the Disney film and J.M. Barrie’s enchanting play, Disney’s Peter Pan Jr. is a modern version of the timeless tale about a boy who wouldn’t grow up! The score includes new arrangements of classic Disney songs, such as “Following the Leader”, “You Can Fly”, “The Second Star to the Right” and “Yo Ho, A Pirate’s Life for Me”.

And, as it all that weren't enough, the festival also welcomes India Dance Wales who present two hypnotic shows on Sunday 10 July, Shishya and Shakuntala, and Everyman Youth Theatre will present Richard II on Sunday 24 July.

Cardiff Open Air theatre once again has a line up of superb shows to suit everyone! And with excellent onsite catering from Dusty Knuckle Pizza and the Otley sponsored bar (available from 6.30 every evening) it's a great summer night out! 


For more information and to book tickets online visit the Cardiff Open Air Theatre Festival website:
everymanfestival.co.uk or call the box office on 0333 6663366.

Follow the festival on
facebook.com/everymanfest
twitter.com/CDFOpenAirFest
Instagram.com/everymancardiff

#CardiffOpenAir16

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Theatre Fangirls (here we go again)

There's some arguments that come around and you think 'really? we're still talking about this?' but also you're not really surprised.

So when it was annoucned Tom Hiddleston was teaming up with Kenneth Brannagh for a production of Hamlet, it was inevitable that the cries of  'Silly fangirls' began. Once again we're confronted with comments that girls 'Only want to see it because he's in it' and 'Aren't interested in the play'.

And because I am a woman, therefore incapable of thinking of him other than in terms of his looks....here he above with a cat looking cute.

But just like Mr H there is both petting a cat, reading a newspaper and looking brooding, I'd like to point out that it's entierly possible to be interested in more than one aspect of a thing at the same time. And secondly I say so what the audience is just there to look at his cheekbones?

I don't have a horse in this race. I think Hiddles is a damn good ac…

Why Elliott & Harper is the company I've been waiting for

I can never resist a good (bad) pun in a title. As the first production from Elliott & Harper opens its doors for previews tonight, it’s worth pausing to think what this new production company means and why indeed we need more like it. Something of a ‘power house’ company formed of Marianne Elliott and Chris Harper. Both coming from the National Theatre- as Director and Producer respectively- there’s a real understanding of both the craft of theatre and the audiences that do- and don’t- come to it there. And theatre made by and produced by theatre people, in the commercial realm. That’s potentially very exciting.








Firstly, the act of two theatre people who really love theatre, really understand theatre both from an audience point of view and an artistic point of view. Secondly, one of the UK’s best directors striking out on her own to make theatre on her own terms. Thirdly, and you bet it’s an important factor, a woman artistic director. It’s all exciting, and has the potential, …

Angels at the National (a reflection before the review)

I had to do a Kushner and give this post a long subtitle.

When I called my PhD thesis "Angels at the National" (I write terrible titles I know) I never thought I'd be able to say it again. Of course, the Gods like to have a laugh at my expense so mere months after I bound the copy, Rufus Norris and Marianne Elliot got together and decided that I clearly hadn't had enough to write about. 


But how does it feel to have the thing that has lived in your head for so long, back, brought to life in front of you? As much as I love the plays, I'm also conditioned to be hyper critical. I know every line (I amazed/freaked out Elliot herself with my ability to know exact quotations on demand). And of course, I have my own expectations about how it should be. How then would it feel to go back? 



At the end of Part 1 I found myself leaning on the railings by the Thames, trying to compose myself and my thoughts enough to move. At the end of Part 2, I'm sure I had forgotten how …